Book Review: Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki released his tenth book last week. The book is titled Enchantment and Guy generously sent me a copy to review here for you all.

For those of you that don’t know, Guy Kawasaki is one of the guys behind Alltop.com, which is kind of like an online content aggregator. It pulls in all the best content from every corner of the web and then ranks it, showing you what’s popular and newsworthy. He’s a founding partner of Garage Technology Ventures and worked for Apple for many years.

What is Enchantment?

Enchantment is not a word you hear very often and when I heard that was the title of Guys new book, I was intrigued. After reading a bit of the book, I understood exactly what Guy meant and I’ve been enchanted as well as know people that have been enchanted by businesses and products. If you’ve ever met someone that’s felt enchanted by something, you know that that product or company is a focal point of their attention, on the tip of their tongue and they can’t wait to talk about whatever it is that company or product does.

Being enchanting is a characteristic that companies should definitely value and work towards because it means they will always have customer or rather, a cult-following like Apple does.

For a long time now I’ve been anti-Apple. I work in the tech field, Windows support ide,  and when people come in and ask me question about Apple or tell me why Apple is better and why I should get their products, it drives me nuts. Up until recently, I’d never even used an Apple product; I didn’t own an iPhone, iAnything and didn’t see that changing, ever.

Well, I started working on a new project, Blog2Android.com, and the demand for me to also provide Apple apps was overwhelming. I just couldn’t ignore it and now I own an iPod Touch and MacBook…

Well, I completely understand why Apple people are the way they are. Apple products really are enchanting. They get hold of you on a completely different level than other products and don’t let go. I’m not saying I’m an Apple person now, and I’ll never admit that 🙂 but I’ve grown to enjoy using the MacBook and my kids love playing games on the iPod.

About the book

Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions (affiliate link)

This book is about changing the way people think, from being even Anti-something to completely standing behind and loving something. It’s much more than a marketing book and the principles inside can be applied to your entire life. I’m a very laid back guy and really just go with the flow most of the time, and I saw some places in my life that would really be different if I learned to use the techniques in this book.

My favorite parts

  • How to make enchantment endure. Chapter 7 talked about making enchantment test time like Apple has done. It has had it’s ups and downs over the years, but once Apple found their own way to enchant, they’ve built such as enormous following for themselves, many that think Apple can do no wrong, and they have been enchanting continuously for the past decade. I personally find enduring to be a problem, so this chapter was gold.
  • How to enchant your employees. Chapters 8. I’ve met people that are enchanted with the company they work for. They are company people, work their tales off and put the company before themselves in a lot of ways. That’s the kind of staff you want as an employer, one that takes the interests of the company to heart and really cares. Being able to instill that kind of feeling in your employees is rare and that’s what this chapter is about.
  • How to resist enchantment. Chapter 12. Believe it or not, there are people out there that can enchant you, but will use that to take advantage of you. Think really good salesperson. They are so sure of themselves, seem genuine and just can convince you of anything. I’ve been stung a few times by these kind of people so this chapter was very interesting.

As a technical guy myself, I thought Guys use of terms like Push and Pull to refer to different ways of enchantment was interesting. Push media for example would be a broadcast medium like Twitter, where you are actively trying to enchant people, or get your message out there. On the other side, Pull media is a medium like YouTube where you put your stuff out there and hope people come across it. You can combine these two as well to create a more powerful affect on others.

Guy is an impressive man and his book didn’t disappoint. If you plan to make an impact on others, there is no impact like that of  enchantment.

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3 People have left comments on this post



» Sandy @ yesiamcheapNo Gravatar said: { Mar 14, 2011 - 09:03:33 }

Dare I say it, but I’m so over guy. Sorry. He doesn’t do a thing for me anymore after seeing his seminars which are basically suckering people into thinking that they can make millions.

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Jesse MichelsenNo Gravatar Reply:

I’m just a casual fan, but the book spoke to me. I really get interested in the psychology of things.

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» Karina CheungNo Gravatar said: { Mar 31, 2011 - 02:03:21 }

Actually I was trying to find out more information about an interview on BBC that I heard on the radio on March 29, 2011, around 00:35am, mountain time in the U.S. The author talked about the three elements of an enchanting product : 1. Likability, 2. Trustworthiness and 3. ?? – I missed that part. Is this book review related to the author that was being interviewed? Would you happen to know the missing 3rd element? Could that be covered in the book that you commented? Thank you for helping me solve the puzzle… I found that concept rather stimulating.

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